Housing

CFP Sustainability Checklist and Guide #2

These guidelines will assist applicants seeking funding for capital projects to ensure that all elements of the sustainability checklist are complete.

1. Funding to Implement the Project

To fund the project:
Are all relevant and related project costs identified in the application package and/or sustainability plan?

The following are minimum cost items to consider according to the scope of your project:

Project Financing

  • Cash, equity, grants, loans, other sources of financing

Project Costs

  • Land or property acquisition costs: Purchase price, taxes, legal fees, environmental remediation, survey, inspection, appraisal costs, other disbursement, city/municipal development charges, city/municipal permit fees, city parkland levy, insurance, mortgage, utility fees, consultants and professional fees, architect and engineer fees, other costs
  • Construction or renovation costs: Renovation/ conversion/ construction costs, finished basement and/or additional living spaced, surface parking, landscaping, furniture and equipment, stove and refrigerators, laundry equipment, other equipment
  • Organizational costs: Administrative costs, organizational infrastructure costs, staff wages, other related labour costs
  • Additional costs: Rent loss during construction, GST, PST, contingency funds
Do the application package and/or sustainability plan clearly show funding sources equal to the total costs of the project?

The total amount (in dollar, $) coming from your funding sources should at least be equal to the total cost of your project. This can either be reported through your Reaching Home funding application or sustainability plan.

If not, you may consider the following:

  • Review your project funding and costs for any mistake
  • Identify additional funding sources and confirm them through official letters of support
  • Revise the scope of your project in order to have costs below the total amount coming from your funding sources
Are all funding sources confirmed through letters of support in the application package?

You must have an official letter of support from each organization providing the funds for your project (usually one letter for each funding source). These letters should be attached with your Reaching Home funding application. Each letter should clearly identify the funding source, the applicant and project to be funded, the amount in dollar that will be provided, and the time when funding will be provided (preferably with detailed day-month-year to day-month-year).

If not, you may consider the following:

  • Review your official letters of supports and follow-up with the organizations if applicable
  • Identify the funding sources for which you should have an official letter
  • Identify additional funding sources and confirm them through official letters of support

2. Project Impacts

Impacts of the project on staff and service requirements:
Do the application documents and/or sustainability plan clearly indicate the impacts of the project (i.e., will be a need for additional staff or services after completion)?

The Reaching Home funding application and/or sustainability plan should clearly indicate the scope of your project. For example, is the project expected to include one of these activities:

  • Construction of a new facility
  • Conversion/renovation of an existing building
  • Addition of new beds/units, new or expanded services (more staff or more clients served)
  • Purchase of land or property
  • Purchase of equipment, appliance, or furniture In addition, your sustainability plan must indicate how the activities will be sustainable five years after the end of your project.

3. Partnerships

Demonstrate support:
Does the sustainability plan clearly identify all partners and indicate support that will be provided by each towards new requirements and impacts of the project?

The sustainability plan for your project should identify:

  • All partners relevant to your project
  • All partners relevant to the delivery of services or housing for five years after the end of the project, if applicable

Depending on the scope of your project, the relevant partners who could be considered, among others, may include:

  • Landowners and developers
  • Agency, church, or other organization to develop land they own ❖ Lawyers and development consultants with strong non-profit and development experience
  • Architects able to design shelters or quality housing within a tight budget ❖ Cost consultants (Professional quantity surveyors) to monitor construction costs from concept through construction to ensure budgets are maintained
  • Community agencies who serve homeless clients and those at imminent risk of homelessness
  • Partners who will share space or provide services after completion of your project

For the successful development and implementation of a capital project, the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) also recommends that organizations acquire knowledge in the following key areas: property development, housing management, financial management, raising government and private funds. It may be necessary to identify the pertinent skills and experience gaps within your organization so you will be able to determine the professional services needed to implement and complete your project.

For more information on items to consider, please consult the "Development Checklist for Affordable Housing" from CMHC.

4. Operational Costs at the End of the Project

After project ends:
Do the application documents and/or sustainability plan clearly indicate funding sources for additional staff or service requirements?

The Reaching Home funding application and/or sustainability plan should identify all the relevant funding sources for the operation of facility/new services. The funding sources must be indicated for the five (5) years after project completion.

Fundraising is not considered sustainable. Therefore, most of the funding for operational costs should come from stable funding sources such as:

  • Province or Territory
  • Housing corporations
  • National organizations such as the Salvation Army or the John Howard Society
Does the sustainability plan clearly show that the annual operational budget will be balanced for five years after project ends? (i.e., annual operational costs must be lower than the annual income)

The total annual amount (in dollar, $) coming from your funding sources should at least be equal to the total operational cost of your project for five (5) years after completion. This should be reported in the sustainability plan for your project.

Annual Income could include: Government supplement/per diem, government funding, income from rent, income from parking, donation, other grants, other income.

Annual Expenditures could include:

  • Building operating costs: Maintenance, repairs, materials, utilities, insurance, municipal taxes, vacancy allowance
  • Organizational expenditures: Administrative costs, organizational infrastructure costs, staff wages and other related labour costs, support services
  • Mortgage and other expenditures

If the annual operating budget is not balanced, you may consider the following:

  • Review your project operational funding and costs for any mistake
  • Identify additional funding sources and confirm them through official letters of support
  • Revise the scope of your project in order to have the appropriate operational funding for five (5) years after the project is completed

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